Stella Dunkley - How To Choose Art For Your Home

by Aileen Mitchell 28. November 2016 08:36

Stella DunkleyWhether you are buying art as a gift, to add to your art collection, or as a potential investment, ArtGallery.co.uk has a wide variety of affordable art to choose from, browse through the collection of artworks in all styles & mediums from the comfort of your home or place of work, created by talented artists from around the UK, once you have chosen your art it is carefully wrapped and delivered safely to your door.

An original piece of art for friends or family on a special occasion, Christmas or birthday is a gift that will last a lifetime, buying or commissioning art for a wedding present for example is a great way for a more personal touch, you could have a honeymoon or a wedding photo made into a lasting momento of this special day, or maybe a landscape painting, limited edition print or photograph from an area that they have fond memories of.

Gift vouchers are ideal if you would prefer the recipient to be able to choose their art. Seascapes are always popular, calm and tranquil oceans or crashing waves below a stormy sky, art can bring thoughts & memories of visits to the coast and has a wonderful way of creating an emotional response and a connection for the viewer.

Gaze at a beautiful atmospheric sunset over the sea in your living room! Or art linked to a hobby or pastime is a great idea, original, contemporary or traditional art will enhance and bring style and colour to any home or work environment.

Some aspects to consider when choosing your art are: the medium, oils & acrylic: acrylic is the modern equivalent to oils, its faster drying & can be used to create a wide variety of effects. Oils create wonderfully subtle blends of colour, both have supports of canvas, linen or wood panel, or watercolour: watercolours can have a beautiful delicate quality, watercolours, prints, photographs and art on paper will need framing for protection.

Colour can play a very important role in our everyday lives, it's mood enhancing, vibrant reds and orange can create a positive & sunny feel when the weather is gloomy! Yellows and golds are uplifting & stimulating, greens and blues are calming and help us to relax and unwind.

The stunning scenery of the Dorset shoreline is the main inspiration for my landscape and seascape paintings, I work in most mediums on canvas, linen & paper, my preferred colour palette varies from vibrant reds to neutral cream and gold & cool greens and greys, I enjoy the challenge of creating light and atmosphere, capturing the changing light of the coast, my inspirations come from the intensity of light and colour at sunrise and sunset, reflections of boats on the water, stormy skies over the sea & the patterns and textures of the natural world. I sell & exhibit worldwide and work to commission on a regular basis Stella Dunkley

 Beyond The Bay To Old Harry by Stella Dunkley

Sunrise Over The Bay by Stella Dunkley

 Magenta Sunset by Stella Dunkley

 Departing Storm by Stella Dunkley

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Malvern Theatres Christmas Exhibition

by Humph Hack 20. November 2016 14:04

 Three female artists based in South Wales have taken over the exhibition space in Malvern Theatres for the next 7 weeks. They all derive their inspiration from the beautiful surroundings in that part of the Principality as well as further afield. What they have in common, as well as their location is superb technical skill and healthy sales record. People like to share their lives with original images of nature whether they inhabit urban or rural environments.
Emma Cownie’s works have a very strong visual impact, derived from bold blocks of colours and an expressive palette that is widely used in modern art and pop art. Looking at Emma’s works you may get a sense of Paul Gauguin’s use of yellow and red, Robert Bevan’s blue green trees with purple, Henri Matisse’s simplification and exaggeration of form and Andre Derain’s bold definition of shape within the landscape. However, her works are not derivative but strongly original.

Dawn Harries’ style is at first sight more traditional, but it is the solidity of the rock formations which populate her coastal scenes which impress. She works in her home studio, but her inspiration comes from the landscape. She uses sketches and/or photographs taken from walks around South and West Wales to produce a varied mix of work, from colourful oils, to monochrome inks. Her works evoke the character of that beautiful area of Wales so well.

Amanda Dagg is becoming an “old favourite” in Malvern. She has sold well, whenever she has shown here before, so it was a particular pleasure to be able to sign her up to the Pre-Christmas exhibition, in the knowledge that she will help solve some people’s present problems. Her style is more decorative than the other two artists, but still rooted in her surroundings and personal experience.

The show is open every day, from Monday 21 November until Saturday 7 January, so it’s a good place to hunt for that special present. Purchases can be delivered within 5 days.

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Movember Special: The Importance of a Moustache

by Aileen Mitchell 18. November 2016 15:53

The moustache is a real statement whether its handlebar, pencil or cowboy. It also plays a key role as a statement in art as well as fashion in everyday life. Join us this Movember as we look back at the historical president of 'the tash'.

One of the first and greatest celebrations of the upper-lip adorner was the Sutton Hoo helmet. This extraordinary object is a pinnacle of Anglo-Saxon burial art. The helmet was found as part of a ship-burial from the very rich archaeological site at Sutton Hoo in Suffolk, England. Look closely at the face mask and you can see that the neatly clipped moustache represents not just a moustache but the tail of a bird flying upwards. Surely one of the most recognisable tashes in art history.

When we think of medieval knights we imagine tall, handsome men astride a horse with – of course – a terrific moustache. This hairy status symbol was of such importance that in the fourteenth century Edward Prince of Wales had an effigy on his tomb showing him in full battle dress armour but with his moustache on show.

We have always looked to our monarchy and aristocracy to keep up to date with the latest vogues. Although Queen Elizabeth didn't sport a handlebar, the Elizabethan era was the start of men choosing to be very bearded. This was then further refined by King Charles I and his iconic handlebar moustache and goatee beard.

There have been many modern artists who have used the moustache as statements in their work, and in fact on people's art! Revolutionary artist Marcel Duchamp, famous for the statement urinal in the 1917 exhibition for the Society of Independent Artists, has also paid homage to the moustache. In a series of works titled 'found objects', Duchamp would take a mundane and ordinary object and alter it, making it extraordinary. L.H.O.O.Q. is a postcard print of the Mona Lisa with Duchamp's addition of a moustache and goatee.

As Duchamp demonstrated, it's not just men who have an important relationship with the moustache in art. Frida Kahlo, surrealist painter most famous for her self-portraits, often depicted herself with a moustache – or more accurately the natural layer of hair that lined her upper lip. This attention to her natural features is for a number of reasons from pride in her Mexican heritage to painting exactly what she saw, to a feminist statement about her main pleasures in life being considered as 'manly'. Putting herself under such scrutiny as she painted, it has been observed that Kahlo would make the hair on her upper lip more prominent than it really was.

Our next moustache-wearing art icon appeared in Spain at the beginning of the surrealist movement. Salvador Dali's moustache is almost as iconic as the melting clocks in his artwork. When asked in an interview whether his moustache was in fact a joke, he responded by saying it was "the most serious part".

Dali's moustache was not only a famous part of his look that we remember him by even today, but an extension of his personality and mood at the time. One day it would be tied in a bow, the next stuck in spikey straight lines, sometimes curving up like the horns of a bull. He also would sometime use his moustache to paint – either whilst it was still attached, or he would use the trimmings to make his own bristle head on a paintbrush. 

 

Van Gogh is another famous artist who had a very close bond with his moustache. Almost every self-portrait he painted includes a beard and moustache – so much so that the painting of himself simply named, Self-Portrait Without a Beard, is one of the most expensive of his paintings going for 71.5 million dollars!

It is interesting to see that in his self-portraits his brush strokes do not change from the texture of his face to the moustache and beard; the only thing that changes is the colour. Art historians consider this as Van Gogh expressing how his facial hair is very much an extension of himself rather than a grown accessory. Closer studies on this subject have also shown how little difference there is between the way he paints his landscapes and the way he paints himself. Another example of very deep levels of an artist expressing their character in their masterpieces.

There are such strong links between artists and the moustache throughout art history it would be wrong to deny its constant presence and significance. Not only is the moustache a statement on a fashion and visual level but an embodiment of an artist's emotions and opinions at that particular stage of their career.

Image credits:

User: vggallery.com/ Self-Portrait with Straw Hat / Public Domain/ Wikimedia Commons

User: The Yorck Project: 10.000 Meisterwerke der Malerei / Self-Portrait Without Beard / Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

User: Karl Stas / LHOOQ (1919) / Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

User: Thomas Gun / Charles I of England / Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

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Art History | Artists | The Art World

Colin Miles

by Aileen Mitchell 4. November 2016 13:57

Hello I’m Colin I am the person who makes sculptures from found objects. I also do marketry pictures but that’s another story.

In order to find the objects that inspire; you have to do a lot of looking. For me that is the best part, beach combing, enjoying the ‘lonely sea and the sky’. These are the essential ingredients of this process.

I am not sure what draws me to the edge of the land; is it space, is it timeless rhythm, is it the light or just the grains of sand? Whatever it is, the wonder lust, the treasure hunt, for me, it is perfect heaven.

Peveril Point Lighthouse - Colin Miles

As I am short-sighted it is always reassuring to actually still be able to find small objects. I like driftwood and stones with holes in. There is a history and truth about them. I particularly look for small twigs in funny shapes. In them I see dancers, jugglers, joggers, jumpers, fliers and figures of fun, all physical freedoms.

With pieces of cloth, sticky paper tape and string, I join bits together, bind them up to make them whole and come alive. I like my figures to jump for joy, to celebrate life. As an early retired person, freedom is obviously important. I also wish to create my own beauty.

A good find is magic; it makes me happy, content, satisfied and fulfilled. It’s like a reward for living, a reason for being; it makes the point of walking on the beach on that day in that particular way. As if the object has found me rather than the other way round.

I am the person who makes sculptures from found objects and I hope you like them.

Beach Huts - Colin Miles

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