Digital Art

by Humph Hack 16. January 2018 11:46

For centuries, artists have used a variety of technologies to assist them in producing images. Almost as soon as a new technology is developed, it is adopted by forward thinking creatives. An early example was Albert Durer, using a frame with a grid made from wires to accurately produce the two-dimensional foreshortened shape of a three-dimensional object.

A few years ago, the British artist David Hockney published his book “Secret Knowledge”. He set out to prove that Vermeer and other Renaissance artists used the “Camera Obscura”, lenses and mirrors to help them produce accurate townscapes, portraits and other art works. He claimed that Caravaggio, Raphael, Frans Hals, Vermeer, Velázquez and Ingres; all used lenses to trace out their pictures. Some in the art establishment were horrified.

Here are two examples of commercial products available more recently; one in the 1840s and a later version sold in the middle of the last century.

But in 1820s the first photographic images were produced, which made the use of lenses in art far more accessible to all artists; they could hold a two-dimensional image in their hand or even project an image onto a surface to trace. Modern Art began to change things forever, and the development of television and then computers heralded the possibility of digital art.

Many artists today, use photography, computers, and graphic tablets to produce both originals and limited edition artworks. The most popular and sophisticated software is probably “Photoshop”, but there are countless other ways in which images can be produced and manipulated. A work can be “drawn” onto a blank page or individual photographs can be manipulated and/or combined to make something unique and totally original. And, in exactly the same way, that “knowing” renowned Old Masters were assisted by technology takes nothing from their achievement, knowing that artists use modern technology to produce an image makes their products no less engaging.

Here are just a few of the artists on the www.artgallery.co.uk website who are leading this field of digital art.

And Venus Rises Red - Georgina Bowater

 

The Harbour, Bouzigues, Herault, France - Memories A' broad

Green Man - Michael Aaron

For other artists, the image is produced without using any photograph as a starting point. As such, these are not reproductions of another artwork and they only exist when they are printed.

Tunnel Vision V - Pauline Thomas

Swimming Pool - Steve Palmer

As ever, with any artwork, it is the end product which matters, not exactly how it has been produced. When creating, the best artists know when to stop; when further work would add no more, and possibly detract. It is the amateur artist who tends to “overwork” a painting. Knowing when to stop is what separates the remarkable from the mundane.

To see more of either digital genre, search for “digital art” in the STYLE section of the ADVANCED SEARCH.

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Art for the Home Office

by Gordon Smith 16. January 2018 10:47

Happy New Year!

It’s great to see in the new year refreshed and with an energised focus on the future. But going back to work after the festive break can be tought, , especially if you’re home-based or work flexibly, as you may miss out on office chat to help lift the spirits.

Instead, why not be the envy of your friends or colleagues and use art to get your motivation levels back up? Our tips on getting your home office space re-energised for 2018, should help you fall back in love with work all over again.

Art to ease work stress

Art is a key element when creating an inspirational workspace, or enhancing that interior look you’re aiming to achieve. Simply stopping to look at a painting for a few moments can help give you a bit of headspace when you’re up against it.

In fact, looking at art can trigger a sense of wellbeing. A study from the University of Westminster found that stress levels reduced after a lunchtime visit to an art gallery. So choosing a painting you love can give you that same art gallery experience at home.

Not only that, but experts recommend that we look away from our computer screens at regular intervals and take a break every 90 minutes. By hanging a painting you love on a wall in front of you, or where you can easily see it, will encourage you to take those all-important breaks.

De-clutter your workspace

First things first, are you starting the new year by looking at the same old untidy office or cluttered desk? Do you feel your spirits drop when you sit down?

It has been proven that there are links between clutter and stress, which can hinder the ability to think clearly, whereas a tidier space helps boost productivity and creativity.

This is the perfect time to do an annual clear out and refresh your space by sorting through paperwork, creating more space and tidying that desk.

To help motivate you and ensure you reduce clutter, why not surround your work space with items that inspire you. Gather together the objects you love to look at, or treat yourself to something new, for example, a lamp, vase or small sculpture.

Vintage potters' wheel candle holder with sea glass by Karon-anne Sharp
Vintage potters' wheel candle holder with sea glass by Karon-anne Sharp Small Matt White Drip Vase by Julie Anne
Small Matt White Drip Vase by Julie Anne

How to choose art for a home office

When it comes to wall art, it’s crucial you choose a painting that you love to look at, so go for a piece that immediately jumps out at you and is unforgettable.

Ideal styles of art for the home office space are landscapes, portraits or still life’s as they can be quite contemplative pieces that can lead to your imagination drifting off and stimulate thought, creativity and mindfulness.

Life. by Laura Kinnell
Life. by Laura Kinnell

Seaghan Lake (Acrylic on Canvas 10'' x 14'') by Barry John Gray
Seaghan Lake (Acrylic on Canvas 10'' x 14'') by Barry John Gray

Abstract art is also great as it elicits a purer emotional response, free from associations with time and place, which could make you feel more energised, positive or empowered when you look at it.

Positive Flow XL 1 by Peter Nottrott
Positive Flow XL 1 by Peter Nottrott

Shades of Grey by Paul Chambers
Shades of Grey by Paul Chambers

If you are wanting to create a specific look and feel for the space, then also take this into consideration when making your choice. For example, if you’re going for a Nordic feel, then clean, muted colours and white will look great, or blues and oranges to complete that mid-Century look you may be trying to achieve.

Winter Flurries  by Bryan Duncan
Winter Flurries by Bryan Duncan Fire Corals  by Lesley Blackburn
Fire Corals by Lesley Blackburn

If your home office is a space just for you, then choose art that inspires and motivates you as an individual. However, if you share the space with a partner or children, then make the selection process a fun exercise for everybody. It may help to agree a style or look in advance, in order to narrow search parameters and make it more manageable.

Choosing a painting that is more generic could be a good compromise for different tastes. A good example of this would be illustrative or character study that gets children and adults alike thinking and talking about art.

Perlas Zu by Io Helena Zarate
Perlas Zu by Io Helena Zarate

Day Tripper by Spencer   Derry
Day Tripper by Spencer Derry

Alternatively, if you have the budget and you can’t all seem to compromise, then this is a good opportunity to create a gallery wall of everybody’s favourite painting.

Where to hang your art

It is important that you hang your painting in a place where you can easily see it or glance at it while you’re working. Ideally, a wall straight in front of your desk.

If your desk is set back from a wall, make sure your painting is striking enough to be seen and admired from a distance. This means you may need to consider the size of the painting, so always check the dimensions before making a purchase.

Likewise, if your desk is against a wall, then you should probably consider a smaller piece that is in proportion to the wall and desk space.

Ultimately, you should hang a painting in a place where you can sit back, relax and enjoy it. Art brings so many benefits, especially when it comes to reducing stress, so what better way to zone out and decompress than by having your dream painting to stare at right in front of you.

Whether you’re lucky enough to have a whole room, a nook or corner of a room, it’s important to create a working environment that you love and want to work in.

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Buying Art

Malvern Theatres - New Year 2018 Exhibition

by Humph Hack 16. January 2018 10:17

Years ago, professional art students were taken through a rigorous regime involving drawing from the life model and various other still-life groups. The development of skills was paramount. Further back than that, a classical training involved working from casts of Greek and Roman figure sculptures and busts. They were considered examples of ideal beauty. There was a consistency of approach to “training” which current students would find totally limiting. On the other hand, students were actually taught, whereas today, some would claim the freedom to experiment lacks focus. So it is, that every new artist has the need to discover their own technique and decide their personal subject matter. The choices they make reveal a lot about themselves.

Aletia Thomas is in love with horses. Her knowledge of their anatomy and personality shines through every brush stroke and bounces off every canvas. Whether the technique is classical or more impressionistic, the horse is the star.  Aletia is enraptured by their curves and contours. Her painting technique describes not only her subject but the emotions they evoke from her. These animals are not mere beasts of burden, they are personalities.

Ian Blaikie’s work is just as technically excellent but his work exhibits a degree of nostalgia. His paintings most often celebrate the achievements of designers, architects and engineers from the past. Whether the subject is a motor vehicle, a bridge or other building, the images hark back to a different time. Even his landscapes have a serenity unspoilt by the ugliness of the Modern World. His approach is more conventional, but none the worse for that.

Ery Burns is the youngest of the three artists on show in Malvern Theatres. The freshness of her work reflects the optimism of the young. The clarity of colour, the cleanness of technique take her abstract pop-art style to another level. She takes inspiration from nature, urban cityscape, the 1980's, and famous surrealist artists like Pablo Picasso and Joan Miro. With a love of thick bold line and vivid colour her paintings have a majestic energy.

All 3 artists are new to showing their work in Malvern Theatres. It continues to be a venue where you will see fresh art throughout the year.

The exhibition is open every day 7 days a week from 15 January until 3 March. All work is for sale, via this online gallery -www.artgallery.co.uk and will be delivered within 5 days of purchase.

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