Digital Art

by Humph Hack 16. January 2018 11:46

For centuries, artists have used a variety of technologies to assist them in producing images. Almost as soon as a new technology is developed, it is adopted by forward thinking creatives. An early example was Albert Durer, using a frame with a grid made from wires to accurately produce the two-dimensional foreshortened shape of a three-dimensional object.

A few years ago, the British artist David Hockney published his book “Secret Knowledge”. He set out to prove that Vermeer and other Renaissance artists used the “Camera Obscura”, lenses and mirrors to help them produce accurate townscapes, portraits and other art works. He claimed that Caravaggio, Raphael, Frans Hals, Vermeer, Velázquez and Ingres; all used lenses to trace out their pictures. Some in the art establishment were horrified.

Here are two examples of commercial products available more recently; one in the 1840s and a later version sold in the middle of the last century.

But in 1820s the first photographic images were produced, which made the use of lenses in art far more accessible to all artists; they could hold a two-dimensional image in their hand or even project an image onto a surface to trace. Modern Art began to change things forever, and the development of television and then computers heralded the possibility of digital art.

Many artists today, use photography, computers, and graphic tablets to produce both originals and limited edition artworks. The most popular and sophisticated software is probably “Photoshop”, but there are countless other ways in which images can be produced and manipulated. A work can be “drawn” onto a blank page or individual photographs can be manipulated and/or combined to make something unique and totally original. And, in exactly the same way, that “knowing” renowned Old Masters were assisted by technology takes nothing from their achievement, knowing that artists use modern technology to produce an image makes their products no less engaging.

Here are just a few of the artists on the www.artgallery.co.uk website who are leading this field of digital art.

And Venus Rises Red - Georgina Bowater

 

The Harbour, Bouzigues, Herault, France - Memories A' broad

Green Man - Michael Aaron

For other artists, the image is produced without using any photograph as a starting point. As such, these are not reproductions of another artwork and they only exist when they are printed.

Tunnel Vision V - Pauline Thomas

Swimming Pool - Steve Palmer

As ever, with any artwork, it is the end product which matters, not exactly how it has been produced. When creating, the best artists know when to stop; when further work would add no more, and possibly detract. It is the amateur artist who tends to “overwork” a painting. Knowing when to stop is what separates the remarkable from the mundane.

To see more of either digital genre, search for “digital art” in the STYLE section of the ADVANCED SEARCH.

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Art for the Home Office

by Gordon Smith 16. January 2018 10:47

Happy New Year!

It’s great to see in the new year refreshed and with an energised focus on the future. But going back to work after the festive break can be tought, , especially if you’re home-based or work flexibly, as you may miss out on office chat to help lift the spirits.

Instead, why not be the envy of your friends or colleagues and use art to get your motivation levels back up? Our tips on getting your home office space re-energised for 2018, should help you fall back in love with work all over again.

Art to ease work stress

Art is a key element when creating an inspirational workspace, or enhancing that interior look you’re aiming to achieve. Simply stopping to look at a painting for a few moments can help give you a bit of headspace when you’re up against it.

In fact, looking at art can trigger a sense of wellbeing. A study from the University of Westminster found that stress levels reduced after a lunchtime visit to an art gallery. So choosing a painting you love can give you that same art gallery experience at home.

Not only that, but experts recommend that we look away from our computer screens at regular intervals and take a break every 90 minutes. By hanging a painting you love on a wall in front of you, or where you can easily see it, will encourage you to take those all-important breaks.

De-clutter your workspace

First things first, are you starting the new year by looking at the same old untidy office or cluttered desk? Do you feel your spirits drop when you sit down?

It has been proven that there are links between clutter and stress, which can hinder the ability to think clearly, whereas a tidier space helps boost productivity and creativity.

This is the perfect time to do an annual clear out and refresh your space by sorting through paperwork, creating more space and tidying that desk.

To help motivate you and ensure you reduce clutter, why not surround your work space with items that inspire you. Gather together the objects you love to look at, or treat yourself to something new, for example, a lamp, vase or small sculpture.

Vintage potters' wheel candle holder with sea glass by Karon-anne Sharp
Vintage potters' wheel candle holder with sea glass by Karon-anne Sharp Small Matt White Drip Vase by Julie Anne
Small Matt White Drip Vase by Julie Anne

How to choose art for a home office

When it comes to wall art, it’s crucial you choose a painting that you love to look at, so go for a piece that immediately jumps out at you and is unforgettable.

Ideal styles of art for the home office space are landscapes, portraits or still life’s as they can be quite contemplative pieces that can lead to your imagination drifting off and stimulate thought, creativity and mindfulness.

Life. by Laura Kinnell
Life. by Laura Kinnell

Seaghan Lake (Acrylic on Canvas 10'' x 14'') by Barry John Gray
Seaghan Lake (Acrylic on Canvas 10'' x 14'') by Barry John Gray

Abstract art is also great as it elicits a purer emotional response, free from associations with time and place, which could make you feel more energised, positive or empowered when you look at it.

Positive Flow XL 1 by Peter Nottrott
Positive Flow XL 1 by Peter Nottrott

Shades of Grey by Paul Chambers
Shades of Grey by Paul Chambers

If you are wanting to create a specific look and feel for the space, then also take this into consideration when making your choice. For example, if you’re going for a Nordic feel, then clean, muted colours and white will look great, or blues and oranges to complete that mid-Century look you may be trying to achieve.

Winter Flurries  by Bryan Duncan
Winter Flurries by Bryan Duncan Fire Corals  by Lesley Blackburn
Fire Corals by Lesley Blackburn

If your home office is a space just for you, then choose art that inspires and motivates you as an individual. However, if you share the space with a partner or children, then make the selection process a fun exercise for everybody. It may help to agree a style or look in advance, in order to narrow search parameters and make it more manageable.

Choosing a painting that is more generic could be a good compromise for different tastes. A good example of this would be illustrative or character study that gets children and adults alike thinking and talking about art.

Perlas Zu by Io Helena Zarate
Perlas Zu by Io Helena Zarate

Day Tripper by Spencer   Derry
Day Tripper by Spencer Derry

Alternatively, if you have the budget and you can’t all seem to compromise, then this is a good opportunity to create a gallery wall of everybody’s favourite painting.

Where to hang your art

It is important that you hang your painting in a place where you can easily see it or glance at it while you’re working. Ideally, a wall straight in front of your desk.

If your desk is set back from a wall, make sure your painting is striking enough to be seen and admired from a distance. This means you may need to consider the size of the painting, so always check the dimensions before making a purchase.

Likewise, if your desk is against a wall, then you should probably consider a smaller piece that is in proportion to the wall and desk space.

Ultimately, you should hang a painting in a place where you can sit back, relax and enjoy it. Art brings so many benefits, especially when it comes to reducing stress, so what better way to zone out and decompress than by having your dream painting to stare at right in front of you.

Whether you’re lucky enough to have a whole room, a nook or corner of a room, it’s important to create a working environment that you love and want to work in.

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Buying Art

Malvern Theatres - New Year 2018 Exhibition

by Humph Hack 16. January 2018 10:17

Years ago, professional art students were taken through a rigorous regime involving drawing from the life model and various other still-life groups. The development of skills was paramount. Further back than that, a classical training involved working from casts of Greek and Roman figure sculptures and busts. They were considered examples of ideal beauty. There was a consistency of approach to “training” which current students would find totally limiting. On the other hand, students were actually taught, whereas today, some would claim the freedom to experiment lacks focus. So it is, that every new artist has the need to discover their own technique and decide their personal subject matter. The choices they make reveal a lot about themselves.

Aletia Thomas is in love with horses. Her knowledge of their anatomy and personality shines through every brush stroke and bounces off every canvas. Whether the technique is classical or more impressionistic, the horse is the star.  Aletia is enraptured by their curves and contours. Her painting technique describes not only her subject but the emotions they evoke from her. These animals are not mere beasts of burden, they are personalities.

Ian Blaikie’s work is just as technically excellent but his work exhibits a degree of nostalgia. His paintings most often celebrate the achievements of designers, architects and engineers from the past. Whether the subject is a motor vehicle, a bridge or other building, the images hark back to a different time. Even his landscapes have a serenity unspoilt by the ugliness of the Modern World. His approach is more conventional, but none the worse for that.

Ery Burns is the youngest of the three artists on show in Malvern Theatres. The freshness of her work reflects the optimism of the young. The clarity of colour, the cleanness of technique take her abstract pop-art style to another level. She takes inspiration from nature, urban cityscape, the 1980's, and famous surrealist artists like Pablo Picasso and Joan Miro. With a love of thick bold line and vivid colour her paintings have a majestic energy.

All 3 artists are new to showing their work in Malvern Theatres. It continues to be a venue where you will see fresh art throughout the year.

The exhibition is open every day 7 days a week from 15 January until 3 March. All work is for sale, via this online gallery -www.artgallery.co.uk and will be delivered within 5 days of purchase.

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Festive Paintings You Can Enjoy All Year Round

by Gordon Smith 15. December 2017 09:00

As we enter the Christmas season, all we want to do is feel warm, cosy and snug. This is when we look for the Hygge effect with blankets, warming drinks and candles to create that cosy feel, and we also look to art to give us that sense of comfort.

We turn to snowscapes, winter landscapes, festive or winter scenes to remind us that we want to be warm and relaxed indoors, and not shivering outside. These are seasonal paintings that tend to work in that moment.

The main challenge with a seasonal painting though, is what do you do with it for the rest of the year? Art is an investment and storing it away for most of the year isn’t a great use of your spend, but there are ways of getting the most of your painting and hanging it all year round.

Art for emotion

Art evokes emotion, so a good starting point is to think about what winter and Christmas means to you. What is your mood at this time of year and how does it make you feel? What one thing says ‘winter’ to you?

It could quite simply be about the spirit of Christmas and how the season makes you feel. Mousehole Christmas lights by Laura Harrison
Mousehole Christmas lights by Laura Harrison

For some people it could be about a feeling of warmth and focusing on the home, or, for others it may be the social side of Christmas and enjoying good company and good food and drink.

Winter sunset, Snowdonia by Stuart Parnell
Winter sunset, Snowdonia by Stuart Parnell

It can also be a nostalgic time as we reflect on the past and look to a new year, so it may evoke childhood memories of how Christmas felt from a child’s perspective.

Snow Day by Steph Morgan
Snow Day by Steph Morgan

Snowscapes

Nothing says winter like a snowscape. We all hope for a white Christmas, which, of course, is rare, so snow-filled scenes are the closest thing to capturing that feeling. With British art being firmly rooted in the landscape tradition, this is a genre where we do well.

As a result, there are so many snowscapes to choose from that capture every mood, spirit or feeling. These paintings range from the more traditional landscape scenes or snow-filled cityscapes, right through to wildlife. If you want to make more of a statement, then why not go all out for something atmospheric and dramatic.

Piccadilly London by Bryn Thomas
Piccadilly London by Bryn Thomas

Wishing it was Christmas every day

If you’re somebody who loves Christmas and you want to capture that feeling all year round, then you can have a lot of fun with art and just go all out with paintings of snowmen, Father Christmas, or Angels. Even images that capture a sense of Christmas magic.

A CHRISTMAS OF ENCHANTMENT  by Carlo Salomoni
A CHRISTMAS OF ENCHANTMENT by Carlo Salomoni

Ultimately, there are no set rules as to what paintings should be hung, and when, so you could throw out the rule book and hang your festive paintings all year round. It would make a great talking point for friends and visitors to your home.

What to do after Christmas?

If you want to make your painting a centrepiece during winter and Christmas only, what do you do with it for the rest of the year? There are a few options; instead of storing it away in a cupboard or up in the loft, why not think about other rooms or spaces in your home where it can hang.

A hallway or landing are great as they tend to be spaces where we’re passing through and not necessarily where we hang around. However, if it’s a painting you love and you want to use it to help spark creativity or help you de-stress, then why not hang it in a home office, study or quiet spot in your home.

You could also use this as an opportunity to re-arrange all your paintings and start the new year with a different outlook and fresh walls. There’s always an image that tends to be forgotten, so why not move it to a new wall and give it a fresh lease of life?

Finally, if you want to go all out, then kids would have Christmas all year round if they had it their way! So why not let them? Christmas really captures their imagination and by hanging festive art in their room will help nurture their creative side.

Art is very subjective, but it also helps to make a more informed choice when selecting a painting, just so you can get the most out of it and make it work for you and your home.

We have many winter and festive scenes on our site and have something for everyone, so why not take a look and see if you can’t find that special painting that says Christmas to you.

Wishing you all a very merry Christmas and a happy New Year!

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Buying Art

Tips for Buying Art as a Christmas Gift

by Gordon Smith 11. December 2017 11:17

If you’ve decided to be more creative this Christmas and are looking to buy art as a gift, then what a great gesture! Art is very subjective however, and making a purchase for somebody else can seem daunting, and even a bit stressful, but have no fear; by taking a fresh approach and adopting a different mindset, our useful tips will help make the selection process a little easier.

Don’t buy for you

There is a belief that when choosing a gift, you should always buy something you’d like to have yourself. In this particular case, we say do the opposite.

Instead, really think about the person you are buying for; their likes, dislikes, passions or interests and also their personality. A fun-loving person, may not like a dramatic piece of art or specific styles, and vice versa for someone who potentially has a more serious outlook.

Stay as open-minded as possible during the process, as a piece that is to your taste may not necessarily be to theirs. You may end up buying a painting that you wouldn’t necessarily have in your house, but for the person receiving the gift it may be that statement piece they’ve been searching for.

Hardy Mountain Pines in Deep Snow. Vercors. France. by Georgina Bowater
Hardy Mountain Pines in Deep Snow. Vercors. France. by Georgina Bowater

Budget

There is a perception that buying art is the preserve of the wealthy. This is not the case, as there are paintings for sale out there to suit every budget, from as little as £30 right up to investment pieces from £3million and beyond!

You don’t need to break the bank to buy a painting, so it is possible to shop around and find a great selection within your price range.

Always think about interiors

Art can transform interiors, so always think about styles and genres when making that purchase. If you’re buying for someone who has a passion for mid-Century interiors, then you’d probably go for a genre like portraiture or abstract art.

Another example is a vintage interior, a painting with a nostalgic feel, or a work set in a location that celebrates vintage would really be standout pieces.

If you’re buying a gift for a specific room, then this is also worth consideration. A piece that makes you reflect or feel mindful would look great in a bedroom or living area, whereas a lighthearted piece would work better in a more social space or kids room.

Hobbies or interests

Buying for a person who is passionate about their hobby or has loads of interests does make the buying process a lot easier, and there are many artists and lots of paintings suited for a very wide-range of interests, such as sport, music, vintage cars or classic films … to name but a few!

This decision does come with a bit of a caveat, however. Sometimes it can be easier to buy something to reflect that person’s passions or interests, but it may not match their interiors taste, or actually be what they want to hang on their walls.

With that in mind, it’s always worth checking the returns policy of the art gallery or the website you are purchasing from, just in case you do need to return or exchange a piece.

Giant's Rock by Robert Jackson
Giant's Rock by Robert Jackson

Size matters

When it comes to the size of painting you should buy, we would recommend keeping it to a manageable size that is more versatile and can hang anywhere in a house.

Resist the urge of making a grand gesture and buying a large painting as it may not necessarily work well with the scale and size of house you are buying for. A small living area, for example, would be dwarfed by a large statement piece.

A more manageable size painting can be placed in any room or on any sized wall, which means there is more scope to hang or place in a space that really brings both the wall and the painting to life.

When all else fails…

If the process is proving to be tougher than you thought, then why not buy a Gift Voucher. It’s still a great gesture and it means you can feel more confident that that person will choose a piece of art they love.

Gift vouchers also range in price to suit every budget, so you could buy for as little as £5, or as much as £500.

Whichever way you look at it, art as a gift is a highly personalised gesture that has a positive impact on many levels. Sometimes, it’s easy to buy presents that are disposable and short-lived, but the gift of a painting is durable, better for the environment and lasts a lifetime.

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Buying Art

Christmas Delivery Dates 2017

by Gordon Smith 7. December 2017 15:00

Happy Christmas!

Original art is one of the most personal and thoughtful gifts you can give. We also have a brand-new selection of hand-crafted gifts available this Christmas. 

At Christmas we all want our presents to arrive on time. Here's what you need to know for this year. 

Our artists always try their best to arrange deliveries before Christmas. Please note that artists are of course in the hands of Royal Mail or couriers. We suggest the following latest dates for you to order to give artists the best chance of getting your art to you in time for Christmas 

Artworks and gifts

Delivery addressLast ordering date
UK 14th December 2017
Europe 10th December 2017

Gift Vouchers

TypeLast ordering date
Gift vouchers in a presentation card 20th December 2017
Email vouchers 24th December 2017

Christmas card

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Diane Griffiths

by Gordon Smith 20. November 2017 15:47

Essentially a landscape artist, abstracts, flora and animals also feature in my work. During my early schooldays I was encouraged to develop a perceived talent in art, a subject I then studied throughout GCSE and A-levels.

However at university I had to consider my career and studied Media and Business, then moving to London to work within the Media Industry. Now based in Kent and whilst holding down a full-time job in London, my world of art has exploded after having many exhibitions in Kent and East Sussex over 2008 and now in 2009 continues to grow strongly.

My Painting: The landscapes I paint are based on places I have been; I use experience and memories as my starting point, however I am fascinated by pushing the contours of a beautiful landscape into the whimsical and the truly magical.

I don't try to re-create images, photography is more than apt at doing that, but push the scene a little further with the imagination. Although I like to try many different styles I feel that Impressionism has always been the strongest influence in my work.

I am a very visual person; nothing gives me more satisfaction than colour, shape, texture and light. I am constantly amazed by the power of colour, how different it can look depending light and adjacent colours. It isn't about representation; it's about so much more.

To me painting is escapism; it allows real thinking time away from the grindstone. I will finish some paintings faster than others when my thoughts are racing, my brush keeps pace. Alternatively it can be a time to let my brain slow down, my focus can turn fully to the painting and I will shut everything else out.

I couldn't say if one state of mind achieves better than the other, it's all emotion and it's all part of life. Once I have signed the painting, I know I am not allowed to touch it with a paintbrush again. The perfectionist inside me would quite simply never want to stop.

My Art: I aim to inspire the resources of your mind and achieve a genuine moment of 100% attention. If you find that I have interrupted your world, even if only for that single moment, then I will be satisfied. To me art is about giving something magical to the viewer; shapes, colours and textures all spark off the imagination, the brain and senses are stimulated, prompting emotions way beyond the visual representation.

It's about appetite, stimulation, fascination, and infatuation. No two brush strokes can ever be the same, no two paintings will ever match, and that is my inspiration."


Go icon Diane Griffiths's gallery »

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Artists Corner | Being an Artist

Malvern Theatre - Christmas and New Year Exhibition -- 27 Nov 2017-13 Jan 2018

by Humph Hack 3. November 2017 14:19

What makes a painting worth $450 million? The simple answer is that at least 2 very rich people decided they wanted to own it. This may have been largely because it was now considered to be by Leonardo da Vinci rather than the painting itself was so good. After all, a few weeks ago, before experts decided it was by Leonardo, it was probably only worth a few thousand. The rather sad thing, is that the undisclosed new owner will probably have to store it in a bank vault to protect the investment, unless they are already surrounded by a team of security guards 24 hours a day. Either way it may be lost from public view.

Art should be enjoyed all day every day, not just by the owner but by friends, family and casual visitors. Paintings don’t have to be “silly” prices to be enjoyable. Many Christmas presents appeal lasts a very short time if you eat or drink it. If you wear it, perhaps a few weeks, but a painting lasts throughout the lifetime of the owner and beyond. Paintings make great presents. The new show at Malvern Theatres has 3 artists whose styles ae so different, you need look no further for that special gift – all at affordable prices.

Sue Mann who is based in the Swansea area is a professionally trained painter who finds working outside the most stimulating. She often uses her bicycle easel to gain access to out of reach locations. She has recently found it very stimulating to take part in “Plein Air” competitions, gaining a handful of prizes and invitations to media appearances. Her style may be best described as drawing inspiration from the Impressionists.

John Penney works from his studio in Shropshire. For over 25 years he has been an artist/craftsman - producing and selling both his paintings and his own wooden furniture. He calls his highly detailed style, "Magical Realism" to describe his mix of genres. He uses complex composition, vivid colour, and often exaggerated perspective, to create drama and mood - often in a slightly surreal "dreamscape" format.

Fiona Robinson’s works do sometimes have recognisable elements, but in truth, all are just an excuse to revel in experiments in colour and texture. The end results have a largely abstract appeal. Fiona, who only started painting seriously recently, hails from Gornal in the Black Country. She hopes to leave her part-time job at some time in the future to paint full-time.

All three artists have many more works on show on this gallery. Jusy click on a name or a painting to see more.

The exhibition runs from Monday 27 November to Saturday 13 January. Early visitors get the best choice.

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Creepy Halloween Art from ArtGallery

by Ros Rowlatt 18. October 2017 12:28

Halloween and art goes hand-in-hand from making decorations to face painting. Whether you're spooked by Francis Bacon or terrified of William Blake's turbulent seascapes, there's no denying that October 31st is as good an opportunity as any to appreciate some great art. Here are some of our favourite seasonal creations on our online gallery.

Halloween For Crows

Julie Stevenson has created a fun Halloween scene to bring a smile to any viewer's face. With creepy little spiders, a gang of crows, bats and pumpkins, there's so much to see. Not to mention the starry night sky being topped off with little stars!

Halloween For Crows by Julie Stevenson
Halloween For Crows by Julie Stevenson

The Joker: Are You Scared?

Ever feel like someone's watching you? This eerie black and white charcoal drawing of The Joker from the Batman comics really comes to life with dark, deep eyes and an energetic sketching style.

The Joker: Are You Scared? by Edward Sheldrick
The Joker: Are You Scared? by Edward Sheldrick

The Ballad Of The Sad Happy Clown (Version III)

They're either the subject of fond childhood memories or terrifying flashbacks! Clowns are always a great addition to Halloween decorations and celebrations. This surreal hand drawn piece is a bold and imaginative image that is bound to draw attention in any space.

The Ballad of the Sad Happy Clown (Version II) by Spencer   Derry
The Ballad of the Sad Happy Clown (Version II) by Spencer Derry

Ghost in the Paint

Moving away from the fun side of Halloween, we come to a more abstract and ethereal interpretation in the form of acrylic on canvas.

The texture creates so much depth that you can see an ethereal spirit but also many faces looking back at you from the background, is this the imprint of a ghost?

Ghost in the Paint by David Smith
Ghost in the Paint by David Smith

Christopher Lee

A great pencil drawing of the legend Christopher Lee. The soft pencil approach to this drawing creates a black and white film effect – it's almost like watching Lee as Dracula in one of the classics!

As we all know, lighting is an essential thing to get right with creating the scary look and there is plenty of lighting detail played about Lee's face. A great gift for anyone in to old horror classics.

Christopher Lee by clare reed
Christopher Lee by clare reed

Keep Back Dracula

John Newbold has created a more modern interpretation of black and white film stills. This dramatic pose and pop art feel creates a striking piece that would look good all year round! The popping red completes the Halloween feel for added effect.   

Keep back Dracula by John Newbold
Keep back Dracula by John Newbold

Literally Frankenstein's Monster

A clever take on a mixed media piece made from the pages of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein's monster. Channelling the black and white classic horror film theme, Frankenstein's face is cleverly shaded with layers of text to create a very realistic head and shoulder portrait – we wouldn't be surprised if his eyes followed you around the room!

Literally Frankenstein's Monster by Gary Hogben
Literally Frankenstein's Monster by Gary Hogben

Make sure to scare and share this Halloween by taking a look at our online gallery for paintings, drawings and much more by our talented community of artists.

Follow us on Twitter and Facebook for daily updates of the latest works of art and news.

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Artists | Buying Art

Malvern Theatres - Autumn Show

by Humph Hack 15. October 2017 17:15

It is rare for a successful artist to paint in many different styles. The public will easily recognise a Monet, a Freud or even a Hockney. As ever it is the exception which proves the rule. So, for example Picasso is known for multiple styles, but even he had periods where all the work being produced at any one time was stylistically similar.

The three artists opening the new show at Malvern Theatres are all recognisable instantly because they all paint in a practised and recognisable style.

Amanda Dagg is amongst the best sellers from the online gallery www.artgallery.co.uk from which all the works on show are chosen. She relishes in the freshness of nature although her work does not attempt realism in the traditional sense.

She hails from South Wales and as well as producing an amazing quantity of work, she helps run a community led gallery in the area. She has successfully shown in the Theatre many times over the last few years.

Victoria Stanway’s works explore the female psyche. Her humorous paintings are much sought after, not just by women, but by anyone wishing to celebrate and understand what makes “girls” different. Victoria is based in Bicester and has not shown here before.

The third artist is Steven Shaw who hails from Solihull. His works – almost photo realist, are supreme examples of the genre. The works in this show are mainly animal studies, apart from two plates of biscuits; good enough to nibble with your cup of coffee in the Bistro. This is also Steven’s first show at Malvern. Artists queue up to be seen in this great venue.

The show runs from Monday 16 October until Saturday 25 November.

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Exhibitions | Malvern Theatres | The Art World


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