Moving art for Remembrance Sunday 2015

by Aileen Mitchell 13. November 2015 15:49

After the breathtakingly beautiful poppy display by Paul Cummins and Tom Piper at the Tower of London last year, more art is being made for Remembrance Sunday than ever. Once again, art becomes a way of expressing poignancy in all manner of styles and forms.

In the spirit of sharing art to commemorate the occasion, we have found that many of our own gallery members have produced works of art featuring poppies.  

Jean Tatton Jones - Remembrance

Jean Tatton’s piece, ‘Remembrance’, is a bold painting that demands the attention of the room. The semi-abstract acrylic is painted in silvers, whites and reds. The poppies around the bottom of the frame leave a stark sky that creates a space for reflection.

Deborah Norville - Summer Dreams

 

Deborah Norville creates a calm landscape background with a soft brush, bringing the poppies into full focus with palette knife detail.

Amanda Dagg - Field of Heroes

Amanda Dagg’s mix-media tryptic inspires reflection. The monochrome landscape contrasting with the vibrancy of the poppies showcases the poignancy of the scene. Creating a painting in three parts really creates an impact, wherever it is hung. 

Paula Horsley - Abstract Poppies (Sculptural)

 

Paula Horsley has created a fascinating dimension to her canvas by using resin in her painting. This gives it an almost sculptural feel up close and like a mosaic from further away. These poppies can be a pleasing abstract up close, and a summery image of a field of poppies from a distance.

Carol Wood - Red Sky at Night

There is plenty of depth to the painting, ‘Red Sky at Night’, by Carol Wood. The smooth background and layered grass in the foreground is very dramatic.

Tracy Jolly - Red Poppy Fields

Breaking away from the popular monochrome used to depict poppies, Tracy Jolly uses gold in her painting. The thick lines that make the flowers have an almost sculptural quality to them.

Angie Wright - Where Poppies Blow

Angie Wright left this as the description for her painting, ‘Where Poppies Blow’:

'The poppies sway in the breeze, a symbol of those who have lost their lives fighting for their country. I wanted to create a painting which recognised the lives of those men and women who are now lost to us. They were real people, who were loved and in turn loved. They laughed and cried and felt the sun on their skin. In this painting there is a sky which was full of sorrow for those soldiers, a sky which drips down the canvas, like heavy rain. There is still light and joy in the painting though, seen by the flowers dancing in the wind to signify the life and energy of those now lost to us.'

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