Statement Art

by Lisa Doherty 15. May 2018 13:03

Be loud, be proud, make a statement!

You feel like you want to take a few risks with art and you’re thinking of buying a painting that really shouts and makes an impact when people visit your house. It’s unapologetic and is the centrepiece of any room.

Welcome to statement art.

How to make a statement

The keywords to any statement piece are big and bold. These are not small, polite pieces as they dominate the space, but also work with its surroundings. These works of art can be made up of bright colours, be period pieces or a dramatic abstract statement.

Set of 3 paintings red abstract A223 by Ksavera Art
Set of 3 paintings red abstract A223 by Ksavera Art Fluit Liefde by Zhana Viel
Fluit Liefde by Zhana Viel

The great thing about statement art is that it works well with any interior style, whether that’s antique, vintage, Nordic, minimal or modern, there is a painting for every taste, not to mention the fact that it can really offset the look you’re trying to achieve and help make that style pop.

Sunset boat in the sea  by MARIA ROM
Sunset boat in the sea by MARIA ROM

Where to hang a statement piece

Naturally, for anybody, or anything, wanting to be noticed it needs to be centre stage. Statement art is no exception and needs be the main focal point in a room. This means hanging it over a fireplace or on a wall where the eye naturally gravitates.

If your house has space, then the larger the piece the better to really stand out and be the main point in a room.

Neon Pink Cityscape by Nineke Havinga
Neon Pink Cityscape by Nineke Havinga

If you’re hanging it a bedroom, then over the bed is ideal, but make sure you get the right dimensions between the ceiling and the top of the bed, or headboard, to get maximum impact and to ensure the eye naturally hits the centre point of the painting.

The same rules apply if hanging it over a desk in a home office. Besides, studies, bedrooms and lounges, other rooms where this art would work include dining rooms or general social areas. A statement piece would also work at the top of a staircase.

Statement art for smaller spaces

As this kind of art is big and bold, a balance needs to be struck between standing out versus completely dominating the space, so it needs to be hung in a room where the painting isn’t overwhelming.

With this in mind, smaller areas such as bathrooms or small kitchens aren’t ideal for large pieces. If you live in a smaller space but would like a statement piece nonetheless, then going for a medium-sized painting won’t lessen the effect and can still make an impact.

Her Lips by ina Prodanova
Her Lips by ina Prodanova

By going for bold colour or striking monochrome the piece can still standout, especially if you have neutral white or cream walls. Again, make them the focal piece of a room to become art that’s hard to ignore.

ANOTHER GEOMETRIC DOODLE by Stephen Conroy
ANOTHER GEOMETRIC DOODLE by Stephen Conroy GRID by Neil Hemsley
GRID by Neil Hemsley

Statement portraits

Usually, people associate statement pieces with landscapes or abstract art, but portraiture can be just as impactful. An image of a person can be just as striking in a room, if not more so, than abstract or landscape paintings.

These days, portraiture is not what people traditionally expect to see in a room, so breaking with convention is also a great way to make a statement.

Male head study No 3 by jean-marc hoth
Male head study No 3 by jean-marc hoth

If you’re feeling bold enough, you can have a lot of fun with portraits by hanging a painting that may contradict the interior look you’re going for, which can also help enhance the statement piece.

A great example of this would be to hang an antique-style portrait in a modernist interior. The contrast of the two styles would certainly make a great conversation piece.

Christopher Gill is an artist who uses contemporary subjects but places them in a Renaissance-style portrait. It makes for striking works of art and ideal for a range of rooms and interior styles.

Girl in the Leather Coat  ( framed original )  by Christopher Gill
Girl in the Leather Coat ( framed original ) by Christopher Gill Lucia de MEDICI  by Shirley Wright
Lucia de MEDICI by Shirley Wright

Statement art on a budget

There is a perception that statement art is expensive, but this isn’t necessarily the case as you can make a statement on any price range – from £45 right up to £4,500.

If you’re looking to buy art as a future investment, but you’re on a tight budget, then why not do some research on up and coming artists or think about latest trends, such as digital art. Statement art isn’t something that only belongs to the rich and famous, it’s out there for everybody and every home.

Sweeten To Taste 3 by Simeon Machin
Sweeten To Taste 3 by Simeon Machin Blue Matter by Rob Thornham
Blue Matter by Rob Thornham

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