Ery Burns - Special Promotion

by gordonsmith 18. April 2017 09:00

There was excitement in the gallery this Friday as up-and-coming artist Ery Burns was being filmed for a new special promotion (more details coming shortly). 

Ery's style is an energetic mix of pop art/abstract and have a wonderful dreamlike quality. 

Ery Burns art

Ery Burns art

Mineral Garden by Ery Burns
Mineral Garden by Ery Burns

Tags:

Artists | Exhibitions

Stephen Williams - Creating Art with the iPad

by gordonsmith 7. April 2017 12:35
Stephen Williams

On my retirement from parish ministry the move from a vicarage to a smaller house meant that space was limited for storing all the art materials and canvases. I have always been interested in working with various media and took the opportunity to acquire an iPad when the parish presented me with a cheque. I have had the iPad for about six months and have been experimenting with various drawing and painting apps.

My initial inspiration came from David Hockney and his book 'Drawing in a printing machine'. My interest grew more and more when I saw the iPad drawings in the book of his exhibition 'A bigger picture'. There are lots of artists now producing work on the iPad and I have found it a very good tool to work with.

I began experimenting with drawing directly on to the iPad and to help me to do this I bought a rubber tipped stylus. The finger works very well after all the iPad was designed to work with the finger however the stylus gives me little more accuracy. My initial concern was that I didn't have a desk top computer to transfer my work so that it could be printed. By by doing some research I discovered that a desk top is not necessary, everything can be done from the iPad wirelessly.

I invested in a good colour printer which also scans and copies and have been able to print my drawings this way. The scanner facility on the printer also enabled me to scan all my A4 fine line pen drawings onto the iPad and with the camera I can photograph my larger pen drawings. The apps that I use for my drawings have a copy function so that I can transfer my scanned drawings from the photograph storage facility in the iPad.

It is early days yet but with time and patience and a great deal of practice some worthwhile work can be produced.

Summer in the Country by Stephen Williams
Summer in the Country by Stephen Williams

The beauty about working with the iPad is that it can be taken anywhere. I can also work without having to have a larger space in which to paint. My wife had a stroke two years ago and that together with a busy parish meant that I had no time for painting. The iPad has changed all that and I can now produce my art work while keeping my wife company. It has given me a freedom and a new medium with which to work and in some ways in greater detail than before. It is possible to use individual pixels to pick our highly detailed features in the drawings.

Gothic Towers by Stephen Williams
Gothic Towers by Stephen Williams

One concern was the printing clarity of the finished art work. Would the definition be clear? Would the pixels dominate the finished print? I need not have been worried, the A 4 prints are very sharp and distinct even printed on standard printing paper. The definition and colour is even better with glossy photo paper and I am about to try printing on high quality art paper. The definition is so good that I have produced a collage print as I call it.

I have a publisher app on the iPad which enables me to transfer my drawings, not only that but I can enlarge each drawing section by section. By doing this I have been able to produce A4 prints of enlarged sections of the drawings to produce large scale separate prints which have then been put together to produce large scale prints from an iPad drawing which measures no more than 4 inches by 6 inches on the iPad itself. The larges multiple print of A4 sheets so far is 46 inches by 35 inches made up of 24 individual A4 sheets of paper.

As I said it is early days yet and there are many artists working in this medium, but for people with limited space and time the iPad is a tool well worth considering.

Aspects of Britain by Stephen Williams
Aspects of Britain by Stephen Williams

Tags:

Artists | Being an Artist

Malvern Theatres - April - May Exhibition

by Humph Hack 2. April 2017 14:47

Some years ago, the Royal Academy in London decided to make the initial selection of artworks for their annual “Summer Exhibition”, from digital photographs submitted online. The establishment were horrified! The selection of works to be shown in Malvern Theatres has been made in the same way for even longer. The artists all sell through this online gallery. The fact that the paintings are nearly always better than the photo has proved right, yet again. The new exhibition in Malvern Theatres, brings three artists from across the country to show here for the first time.

Marc Todd is a contemporary landscape painter, living and working in the UK City of Bath. Much of his work is based on subjects and locations in and around Bath, London, and the South West of England. He takes his primary inspiration from structure, texture and composition, and has a love for the application of vivacious colour palettes, dramatic and contrasting light effects, and dynamic mark-making to create aesthetically captivating surfaces. Much of his work is conceived 'in situ', and is always based upon real places observed first hand.

Originally trained in graphic design, Marc previously worked as a Creative Director for a number of large London based advertising agencies, before setting up his own creative consultancy advising clients including the BBC, Dow Jones International and Hearst Publishing. Marc became a full time painter in 2014 and has since sold work to collectors internationally, both private and corporate, and exhibits his work on a regular basis.

Marc's works cover a range of subjects including cityscapes, trees within the landscape, and expressionistic floral compositions. All the works in this exhibition draw their inspiration from the natural world.

Martin Leighton was born in Montrose, Scotland in 1951. A self-taught traditional artist, he now concentrates on painting in oils on canvas at his studio on the South Coast. He paints a variety of subjects including landscapes, seascapes, wildlife & still life, but he is passionate about portrait and figurative subjects having undertaken many commissions. Painting with oils is his favourite medium and he aims for his paintings to look realistic yet not photographic. Lighting is an important factor so he paints from life models. Achieving skin tones is such a challenge. He becomes totally engrossed in the painting until satisfied with the finished work.

His work has been shown in the UK and South Africa and paintings are now in private collections worldwide. He is happy to undertake commissions.

Anna Cumming lives in Malvern and walks the hills for a couple of hours a day with her dogs. Some days are unremarkable, but on others it’s breath-taking. Just before or after a storm; or when the mist is in the valley, and we have a white rainbow in a cobalt blue sky above it; or the October sunsets; or just an odd cloud formation and interplay with the sun or moon. All this feeds into her paintings.

She loves the hills, but is also drawn to the sea. Her works shows an interest in moody skies, turbulent seas, interesting reflections and the play of light. Her paintings are based on experiences from St Ives to Scotland, but the intention is to capture a mood or energy. The location doesn’t really matter if it evokes something for you.

The exhibition is open every day until May 13th – 38 works in total.

As ever, all the works on show can be purchased via an Arts Council sponsored interest free loan. There’s no excuse not to own something truly original.

Tags:

Easter Eggs in Famous Art

by Aileen Mitchell 14. March 2017 11:10

This is for everyone who has been told to "stand back please" when examining a piece of art. This month we bring you 'Easter eggs' in famous works of art - the secret bits you may have missed. 

Easter eggs - unexpected or undocumented features in a piece of work - have appeared in artwork as far back as ancient societies and have been anything from a sneaky self-portrait to a UFO sighting! Here are some of the most well-known Easter eggs in art that you may have missed:

The Creation of Adam c. 1508-1512 by Michelangelo 

The Creation of Adam

This renowned work from Michelangelo has graced the Sistine Chapel since 1508, and has been copied, parodied and satirised many times. But how many noticed a tribute to the artist's passion for science and the human anatomy as well as his fine painting?

It appears that God floating in his crimson pod to the right of the piece, complete with seraphim, is the exact outline of the human brain. The leg of one of the cherubs is in the correct place and shape for where the spinal chord is attached, and another's foot is in the place of the pituitary gland. The floating green scarf is even in the precise location and shape for the vertebral artery. 

If that all sounds a little too much like coincidence, you may also want to know that God even extends his arm to Adam through what we now know as the prefrontal cortex. This is the part of the brain that gives humans the gift of reason and deliberation - something that sets us apart from animals. There is also a sad looking angel in the area of the brain that is activated when we experience sad emotions.

Although the discovery of the prefrontal cortex was not until the 20th century, Michelangelo had a profoundly advanced knowledge of the human anatomy due to years of dissections from the age of seventeen. But the mystery continues as dissection of the brain alone does not reveal which parts are activated for different emotions. Could this be coincidence?

With all this new information, a controversial interpretation of the art has arisen. For hundreds of years scholars believed God to be pointing at Adam as the title suggests, giving him life. After the discovery of the anatomically correct brain representation, some believe Adam is in fact pointing at God, which gives the painting an entirely different meaning. Was Michelangelo suggesting God to be a creation of the human mind? We'll never know the true answer, as none of these things were recorded by the artist. We are left to gaze and wonder...

Madonna with Saint Giovannino - Domenico Ghirlandaio

Madonna with Saint Giovannino (1449-1494)

This Italian Rennaissance artwork by Domenico Ghirlandaio is subject of much online debate. There is some speculation over who actually painted the piece, but this is not the issue that has fuelled so much debate. People are talking about the small, dark shape in the sky behind Madonna's right shoulder, which is believed by many to be a UFO. Up close, the dark shape certainly does look a little extra terrestrial and almost spaceship-like. Others have backed up this observation by adding that the lone figure in the distance and his dog are also looking up at it. 

These shapes, however, are quite common in this era of artwork and were intended to resemble a gap in the heavens where divine light would shine through onto the subject in the painting. It is very much a religious trend that was around a lot in Rennaissance art. Not alien appearances. 

 

The Mona Lisa 1503-1505 - Leonardo da Vinci

Mona Lisa

One of the most famous artworks of all time, mentioned in many conspiracy theories and books is Leondardo da Vinci's Mona Lisa. Art historians recently discovered the existence of another woman painted below the surface which raised even more questions and theories about the work. On close inspection we can also see that the artists has initialled "LV" in her right eye and the number 72 on the bridge in the background. There is also a theory that the lady in the painting is pregnant, as her arms are covering her stomach and she is wearing a veil commonly used by Italian women before and after childbirth.

 

The Arnolfini Portrait - Jan van Eyck

Close up of The Arnolfini Portrait Mirror

The Arnolfini Portrait

Another very famous painting from 1434 that demonstrates Jan van Eyck's meticulous brush skills in the details in the woman's dress to the right of the scene. Although it's bursting with detail for us to appreciate, there is something you may not have spotted from behind the red ropes of the National Gallery. 

Look carefully at the back wall in the painting and you'll see a mirror. There are two new people painted in the reflection of the mirror, presumably the other guests in the room that we cannot see from the position the portrait was taken from! Art scholars think that one of these people may be a sneaky self-portrait of van Eyck himself, as one of the guests in the mirror has their hand held up in a gesture of greeting. 

Take a look at our online gallery and see if you can spot an Easter egg in our own artists's paintings!

Image credits:

The Creation of Adam/ en:Image:Creation of Adam.jpg/ Public Domain/ Wikimedia Commons

Madonna with Saint Giovannino/ http://www.italymagazine.com/news/madonna-saint-giovannino-ufo-inspired-art/ 

The Mona Lisa/ Musée du Louvre/ Public Domain/ Wikimedia Commons

Tags:

Art History | Artists

Artists Inspired By Mothers

by Aileen Mitchell 27. February 2017 10:37

Mother’s Day is just around the corner (26th March – put it in your diary!). Today we look at mothers who inspired, encouraged and modelled for some of the most famous artists of all time.

Mother and Child by David Freeman
Mother and Child by David Freeman

Lucian Freud, one of the most celebrated 20th century portrait artists, had a close relationship with his mother, which we can see in his portraiture. Throughout Freud’s childhood his mother took a very keen interest in his talent, and later his career. This all stopped, however, when Freud’s father died. The death of Ernst L. Freud had a catastrophic effect on his mother, Lucie, who suffered from deep depression until she died.

It was in her long period of depression that Freud began to paint her in a collection of very intimate works. These are very detailed snapshots into a private time with mother and son that really shows the lengths of her suffering and distance from her son and the world. Works such as, ‘The Painter’s Mother Resting I, 1975-1976’ are some of Freud’s most well-known and critically acclaimed. 

It is believed that throughout his mother’s period of depression, Freud spent over 4,000 hours painting her. Art historian, Lawrence Gowing, wrote that this was the longest time in three hundred years since a painter showed so much about their relationship with their mother in art since Rembrandt.

This picture is a faithful representation of one of Rembrandt's portraits of his mother.

Rembrandt van Rijn, iconic Dutch artist, is well known for documenting his own self-portraits to show his aging process. He also used his mother as a model for many of his portraits to display similar details of aging. It was common during Rembrandt's era for artists to hone their skills by creating portrait studies of aging subjects, however Rembrandt took his portraits one step further. Using costume and lighting, he created much more theatrical interpretations of his mother that have become highly collectable. 

 

Potrait of the Artist's Mother - Vincent van Gogh

Vincent van Gogh has to have a mention here, as he is also one of the most famous artists who was directly inspired by his mother. Anna Carbentus van Gogh was an energetic, family oriented woman who always expressed great affection for her children and husband. One of her beliefs to a happy life was spending time watching flowers grow. She divided up responsibility of the family garden between all the family, which meant her son Vincent spent a lot of his time around flowers that can be seen later in his artwork. Anna was an enthusiastic amateur artist herself and loved to sketch flowers and plants. She noticed van Gogh had a keen talent for drawing and painting their garden flowers from a young age and continued to show her support when he became a full-time artist.

 

Arrangement in Grey and Black No.1 by James Abbot McNeill Whistler

The Whistler's Mother, or to give it its correct title, Arrangement in Grey and Black No.1 is one of the most famous paintings of an artist's mother. Originally meant to be a portrait of the much younger daughter of an MP, Maggie Graham, this convas was instead used as a study of James Abbot McNeill Whistler's mother. 

In a letter to a friend, Whistler's mother explained how Graham had not shown up for a potrait appointment, and how she had decided to stand in. Anna McNeill Whistler also detailed how her son had failed to finish a painting of Mr Graham despite several sittings, producing only half finished, unsuccessful portraits. Anna Whistler was also a very supportive mother and was even James Whistler's art agent for a time when she stayed with him in London.

Blue Iris in my Garden by Simon Knott
Blue Iris in my Garden by Simon Knott

Van Gogh’s feelings of isolation from the family increased as he got older. His unusual love life, his unorthodox views of the world and his battle with mental illness were all said to be strains on the family. Despite this, he always enjoyed sending his most prized paintings back home to his mother. These included giant irises, roses and great bouquets of flowers – all of which he knew she would love. Van Gogh’s famous portrait of his mother also captures her proud and vibrant nature in the colours chosen by the artist. Whilst painting his mother’s portrait he wrote to his brother Theo, “I am doing a portrait of Mother for myself. I cannot stand the colourless photograph, and I am trying t do one in a harmony of colour, as I see her in my memory.”

The theme of motherhood is also used by many of our own artists at artgallery.co.uk. Have a look at some of our own artists inspired by mothers…

Madonna Of The North by Stephen Davison
Madonna Of The North by Stephen Davison

Stephen Davison has taken inspiration from visit to an Inuit community and their culture of loyalty and motherhood. This rich monochrome oil painting is based on a photograph taken by Henry G. Kaiser circa 1906.

Happy Memory by Mrs Wilkes
Happy Memory by Mrs Wilkes

Mrs Wilkes’ line drawing is a great modern take on the notions of motherhood. The simple addition of red lips and the mark on the mother’s tummy draws the eye to the main theme of the drawing. 

abstract mum by Sandy Jai Hughes
abstract mum by Sandy Jai Hughes

Sandy Jai Hughes has created a portrait of a mother and three children in the famous cubist style of Pablo Picasso. She has also incorporated texture into the piece by adding papier-mâché stained with coloured ink.  

Mother Protects Her Child by Hanan Saied
Mother Protects Her Child by Hanan Saied

Hanan Saied has created a dramatic acrylic on canvas depicting a Nubian woman in traditional dress protecting her baby from the natural disasters in the wold like flooding and tsunamis.

Take a look on our online gallery to find more art from our own artists inspired by their mothers.

Image credits:

Portrait of Rembrandt's mother/ Own work photo of Horst Gerson 1968 catalog/ Public Domain/ Wikimedia Commons

Portrait of the Artist's Mother/ Mefusbren69 (talk | contribs) / Public Domain/ Wikimedia Commons

Arrangement in Grey and Black No.1 by James Abbot McNeill Whistler/ Musée d'Orsay/ Publlic Domain/ Wikimedia Commons

 

Tags:

Art History | Artists

We've Been Awarded Feefo Gold Trusted Service Award 2017!

by Aileen Mitchell 20. February 2017 17:44

ArtGallery.co.uk has won a Feefo Gold Service award, an independent seal of excellence that recognises businesses for delivering exceptional experiences, rated by real customers.

Created by Feefo, Trusted Service is awarded to businesses that use Feefo to collect genuine ratings and reviews. A badge of honour, this accreditation remains unique as all the awards are based purely on the interactions with verified customers. This feedback has been collated by the Feefo review platform, with the accolades being awarded based upon performance. 

We met the criteria of collecting at least 50 reviews between January 1st 2016 and December 31st 2016, and achieved a Feefo service rating of between 4.5 and 5.0.

Aileen Mitchell from ArtGallery.co.uk said:

“It’s a real honour to receive this award from Feefo. To be recognised for delivering exceptional experiences to our customers is a great achievement.
We’ve been working hard to ensure our customers receive the best service possible, and being able to listen, understand and respond to their needs has enabled us to improve our offering in 2016. We’re looking forward to another successful year ahead.”

Andrew Mabbutt, CEO at Feefo added:

“We would like to offer our congratulations to all the winners of this year’s Feefo Trusted Service award. We are so proud that so many businesses are putting customer service first.,”

“We have been working closely with all our customers to build trust and transparency online, and ultimately helping shoppers buy with confidence and make better decisions.” 

Feefo is a ratings and reviews, and customer analytics platform. They collect genuine, purchase-verified reviews on behalf of over 3,000 businesses. Feefo ensures that all feedback is authentic by matching it to a legitimate transaction. We believe this is the best way to combat the rising issue of fake reviews.

To read our reviews, please go to our ArtGallery.co.uk reviews on Feefo.

Feefo Gold Trusted Service Award Badge

Tags:

Malvern Theatres - Spring Exhibition 20 February - 1 April 2017

by Humph Hack 19. February 2017 15:36

We try to make the selection of artists we invite to Malvern Theatres a mixture who have never shown in Malvern before as well as some who are firm favourites. The three in the current show are all new.

Martin Ball is a self-taught artist from the Bristol area with a background in graffiti art and illustration.

His work is built from his love of colours, energy and emotion.  He aims to create works which add a real visual impact to any room.

Like artists for generations before him, he has chosen currently, to concentrate largely on one style. This focus allows him to explore subtle differences in tone and balance – reaching for perfection with every new work. But, like all artists before, he will probably never feel he has achieved this final step. In the meantime we can revel in some of the most energetic and vibrant works Malvern has ever seen.

Selling online is a newish venture for him. He has, however, attracted significant attention on the internet and is already selling well.

 

David Barber has a B.A. Hons Degree in Art and worked for many years as an Illustrator and Graphic Designer.

 A large proportion of his early working life was spent in the magnificent landscapes of the Cumbrian and Peak District - National Parks. From these early days he developed a real love for the peace and beauty of these places. His paintings are produced in response to frequent walks through these wild and often bleak open spaces. They are an attempt to capture some of the light and freshness of nature through a thoughtful use of colour and tone.

Early stages of a painting progress quickly with rapid brush strokes applied very loosely to the canvas to sketch in the major features of the composition. A tonal under painting is built upon these initial marks and this is followed by the application of the major colours. Final adjustments to colours and compositional elements are then made to complete the painting. Wherever appropriate he retains as much of the initial 'sketch' phase in the final work as possible, as it's often this stage that gives the paintings their vibrancy.

He produces paintings that can hold your attention with their rich colours or carefully placed details. He doesn't rely on tricks, but completes his works with care, love and patience. He says,

“I want owners of my work to feel as though they've bought a jewel that they can treasure”.

David’s work is held in several galleries and until recently, these have been his only outlet. Selling online is a newish venture for him.

David Moore was born in Derby. He is entirely self-taught but, as can be seen from the work in this exhibition, clearly has a high degree of natural ability.

Some artists adopt a style which they settle into, going on to refine and hone the outcome over a number of years. Others go through a series of styles over time. Unusually, in David’s case, he has chosen to paint in a wide variety of genre, thereby showing an impressive degree of skill. He is influenced by many great artists, which is why his artworks are so varied. His strongest influences are the French Impressionists.

 The works in this exhibition are largely in oils but all are on canvas. His works have been purchased world-wide.

The exhibition is open every day - all day until the last show closes until Saturday 1 April.

Tags:

Why Do We Draw Hearts In The Famous Shape?

by Aileen Mitchell 1. February 2017 14:03

Kaleidoscope Butterfly Heart Picture by Sara Lawson
Kaleidoscope Butterfly Heart Picture by Sara Lawson

The heart shape is a world-recognised symbol of love, romance and conversely sacrifice.  It can be seen everywhere – it's even on our emoji keyboards in multiple colours, and being trademarked by footballers. Although the heart shape bears little resemblance to the anatomical shape of the heart, it has been used and accepted as the recognised shape since the late Middle Ages and depicted this way in art history. 

Up until the Middle Ages, the heart was typically depicted as a pear – yes, a pear – or a pine cone, and then the shape seems to have been turned 180 degrees so that the point faced down with the scalloped edge at the top. There are no records that explain why this change occurred or why it then became the way to represent the heart, but from 13th and 14th century Britain the heart symbol was recognised as the same way up that we see it today.

Saint Augustine by Philippe de Champaigne

Saint Augustine by Philippe de Champaigne (1645 - 1650)

Although this shape that hasn't changed in hundreds of years and was established fairly quickly, it was not used as a symbol of romantic love until later. The heart shape during the Middle Ages still symbolised exactly what it was meant to be: the heart. This led to its use in many religious paintings, most famously works painted for Martin Luther, an important influencer in the Protestant Reformation in the 16th century. The 'Sacred Heart' of Christ was often depicted with the new shape, and was supposed to remind people of Jesus' sacrifice for the good of humanity. Not only in art, but the new shape got top billing on the deck of playing cards for the heart suit during the 15th century – a design that remains the same today.

 Sacred Heart of Jesus with Saint Ignatius of Loyola and Saint Louis Gonzaga by Jose de Paez

Sacred Heart of Jesus with Saint Ignatius of Loyola and Saint Louis Gonzaga by Jose de Paez (1729 - 1790)

There were some variations in the design of the heart shape – particularly in religious paintings. Some painters still kept the aorta on show, but this extra detail gradually died out because the heart symbol we see today was already recognised on playing cards and many other places. 

There are various theories as to how and why the new shape came about: some say it is the shape of fig leaves, ivy leaves or the water lily – all symbols associated with fidelity. Some say that the top of the shape represents the buttocks, breasts and various other parts of the human anatomy associated with desire. These hypotheses, however, appear to have come about in the 1960s and have no real historical evidence to suggest this is the case. There doesn’t even appear to be sufficient evidence connecting the old pear shaped heart with the newer version.

 

Big Pink Heart (circa 1910)

During the 19th century, a period heavily influenced by the Romantics (late 18th century to early 19th century), the heart symbol became heavily associated with romantic love, passion and sacrifice. This was also the time when the penny post created the craze for greetings cards. St Valentine's Day cards with copious, heavily decorated heart symbols were very popular and, at the time, deeply romantic. Since then the use of the heart around St Valentine's Day has become more popular than ever.

Image from 'Keith Haring: The Political Line' exhibition by Keith Haring

In contemporary art, artists took the heart symbol and included it in some of their most famous works. Keith Haring, the American artist and social activist used hearts in his earliest work and carried this theme on throughout his entire career. At a glance, the vibrant, cartoon-like simplicity of Haring's illustrations look innocent and fun. The drawings are in fact of two men in love, which was a bold and positive statement during the time it was created in the 1980s. The positive statements were praised as helping society accept people for who they were. The bold lines around the heart are seen as large gestures of positive energy – something very characteristic of Haring. He was believed to be a real romantic and noted for believing in the best in humanity with the power of love.

Queen Kate of Hearts by Marietta Osyan
Queen Kate of Hearts by Marietta Osyan

Tracey Emin had a variety of live exhibitions of her neon signs, most famous among the locations were Times Square and The Peninsula, Hong Kong. These neon signs were messages of love, often surrounded by the heart symbol. In a world where most signs are advertising, a message of genuine love really stands out – particularly when it has a heart drawn around it. In an interview with the White Cube gallery Tracey Emin explained, "It's an eternal statement about love […] Even if it sounds over romantic or corny, at the end of the day nearly everyone must have experienced that." 

Love Heart 'embrace' Lino Print by Lauren Downes
Love Heart 'embrace' Lino Print by Lauren Downes

After much research and few answers, historians have concluded that there are a number of possibilities to explain the reason why the heart symbol is the shape it is, but none of them have been documented. Much like art itself, the answer to our title is subjective – a heart shape can be the way it is for any reason you want.

Why do you think hearts are drawn the shape they are?

Golden Heart by Kris  Mercer
Golden Heart by Kris Mercer

Image credits:

Saint Augustine by Philippe de Champaigne/ Gift of The Ahmanson Foundation/ Public Domain/ Wikimedia Commons

Sacred Heart of Jesus with Saint Ignatius of Loyola and Saint Louis Gonzaga by José de Páez/ http://arttattler.com/archivelatinamerica.html/ Public Domain/ Wikimedia Commons

Early 20th century Valentine's Day card, showing woman holding heart shaped decoration and flowers, scanned from period card from ca. 1910 with no notice of copyright.

Keith Haring: The Political Line/ Aaron Muszalski - Flickr/ Public Domain/ Wikimedia Commons

Tags:

Art History | Artists

Winter Exhibition at Malvern Theatres - 9 Jan - 18 Feb 2017

by Humph Hack 8. January 2017 14:25

All artists draw inspiration from the world about them. In some cases the starting point is nature itself, in others it is humanity, while for yet others, the world of fantasy takes over. But in every case, art without reference to elements which are recognizable cannot engage the viewer. And, it is the capacity to engage which separates the noteworthy from the merely mundane. Art should not be for decoration but for far more. Living with a good work of art involves a daily conversation. Owning a work by one of the 3 artists showing in the new exhibition in Malvern Theatres would make such a dialogue possible.

 Miriam Meek had a love for painting and drawing throughout childhood. She began devoting more time to developing her style of painting following her youngest child starting school. Now several years later, she has exhibited across the Midlands as well as selling via the internet. 

Working with acrylic, her semi abstract paintings are inspired by the sky and it's ever changing colour and movement. Whatever the time of day or the time of year, as the light changes, the sky provides endless new ideas. Whether it is vibrant or a gentleness in the light depicted, each painting has a journey and a story of it's own.

Iso Bella chooses a similar mode of expression, but for her the whole landscape becomes her inspiration. She works in a variety of media. Each, whether, watercolour, oils or acrylics allows and encourages different interpretations of what she has observed. Although she also produces prints, all the work in this show are paintings on canvas. She has exhibited and sold across the UK. Both Miriam and Iso produce works which, although drawing inspiration from nature, rely upon their images evoking the transient nature of the play of light in the natural environment. Photographic they are not, they are more real as a result.

Rachel Blackwell’s works may at first glance seem more straightforward. Her images are all recognisable, but of course, all are imagined, not records of real events. Her work is often bought by parents for their children but is loved by both. All of us have memories of tales told to us and by us, intended for the young, but enjoyed because they continue to echo around our heads as innocent memories. This is the World that Rachel inhabits.

The exhibition runs every day – all day from January 9th to February 18th.

 

Tags:

Capturing The Beauty Of The Rain In Art

by Aileen Mitchell 6. January 2017 09:00

From 'Purple Rain' to impressionism, this month we take a look at how art celebrates the beauty of some classic British weather. January isn't exactly famous for its sunny skies, so what better time to throw a positive and artistic light on our winter elements?

The impressionist painters of the 19th century were also known for celebrating wet weather in their art. A large part of impressionism is about capturing the ever-changing light and atmosphere in a painting. For example, Renoir's beautiful sunny afternoon pieces and Claude Monet's dreamy botanical landscapes. But there are some famous pieces that depict less than ideal weather conditions for painting en plein air, as the impressioists did. 

Paris Street; Rainy Day by Gustave Caillebotte

Paris Street; Rainy Day by Gustave Caillebotte

Although it may not seemlike the typical style of impressionist paintings with its almost 3D-like quality, 'Paris Street; Rainy Day' shows a very real atmosphere in the way the rain is painted, shimmering on the cobbled streets. 

Hiroshige van Gogh

Bridge in the Rain by Vincent Van Gogh (right, seen here with Hiroshige's original, left)

Vincent Van Gogh was a huge fan of Japanese art, so much so that he created his own paintings in the same style. 'Bridge in the Rain' is actually Van Gogh's painted copy of the original print by the Japanese artist, Utagawa Hiroshige. Although the dimensions were kept the same, Van Gogh has added his signature textured brush strokes and vibrant colour to the piece to make it his own. 

Jockeys in the Rain

Jockeys in the Rain by Edgar Degas

Edgar Degas, one of the founding fathers of impressionim, is famous for his equine art and portraits of ballet dancers. Here we see the jockeys and their horses in the rain but in the rain. Degas painted many scenes of jockeys and horses, but not many in the rain. Degas's classic delicate strokes and depiction of the light creates the impression of soft and heavy rain. 

Morning on the Seine

Morning on the Seine In The Rain by Claude Monet

Unlike the dreamy landscapes of river on sunny afternoons, Claude Monet's 'Morning on the Seine In The Rain' depicts the busy surface of the river as rain drops hit it. The blend of the same colours from the sky and the trees into the river create the impression of a downpour and a very wet morning. 

ArtGallery artists capturing the rain

Evening City Rain by Aisha Haider

Evening City Rain by Aisher Haider

Evening City Rain celebrates the atmposheric scene of a rainy evening. The very realistic rain drops in the forground create the illusion of looking out at the painting through a window onto the rainy street. 

Silhouettes by Stephen Casey

Silhouettes by Stephen Casey

Stephen Casey creates the feeling of falling rain in the large, vertical brush strokes that make up the background of the piece. 

After Rain by Olena Topliss

After Rain by Olena Topliss

Olena Topliss has created a very dramatic skyscape achieving photorealism with her dabbed, soft clouds. Playing with light in a way that would make any impressionist proud, this piece is very atmospheric and really captures the beauty of a rainy landscape. 

Autumn Rain by Robert Jackson

Autumn Rain by Robert Jackson

Robert Jackson's abstract is a very tangible piece portraying condensation, water droplets and the suggestion of an autumn landscape in the background.

The Walk Home  by Pippa Buist

The Walk Home by Pippa Buist

A watercolour scene reminiscent of Caillebotte, Pippa Buist has created a classic city street scene in the rain. The light reflected on the wet pavements and water of the canal really gives the viewer the beautiful impression of a very wet day. 

Fin by Yary Dluhos

Fin by Yary Dluchos

Yary Dluchos's oil painting on canvas has bold strokes and palette knife strokes that catch the constantly changing atmosphere in a scene that impressionism also captures. The drips trickling down the canvas in a background layer gives the sensation of drizzly weather, combined with downward strokes emulate falling rain.  

Raindrops On Hosta Leaves by Kate Esmarch

Raindrops On Hosta Leaves by Kate Esmarch

A subject can be beautiful to observe and paint whether it is a wide open landscape or a very small detail. 'Raindrops On Hosta Leaves' is a great photorealist acrylic painting that captures the small but beautiful detail of raindrops on a leaf. 

Londoners in the Rain by Lesley Blackburn
Londoners in the Rain by Lesley Blackburn

London is always a great muse: full of drama, interesting scenes, and a never ending opportunity to people-watch. Lesley Blackburn has captured the hustle and bustle of a busy London street in the rain wit her oil on canvas painting. The wet, reflective pavement in the foreground really catches the eye and sets the rainy scene from a firest glance. 

Find more paintings, illustrations and drawings on our gallery that either depict the rain or distract you from it on our online gallery

Image credits:

Rue de Paris, temps de pluie, Gustave Caillebotte (1848–1894) / 5wEUCOlEf-EaVQ at Google Cultural Institute / Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

Montage personnel de deux images : un tableau original d'Hiroshige et une copie de Van Gogh / 'Own work' / Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

Jockeys in the Rain, Edgar Degas 1886 / Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

Morning on the Seine in the Rain, Claude Monet 1897 - 1898 / Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

Tags:

Art History | Artists





Own Art makes buying art easy and affordable - spread the cost of your purchase over 10 months with an interest free loan. Find out more

News and information

Contact us

  • ArtGallery.co.uk
    Spencer House
    34 Long Street
    Tetbury
    Gloucestershire
    GL8 8AQ